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Five Photos, Five Stories–Day Five

Five Photos, Five Stories–Day Five
Wild Bird Wednesday–Pileated Woodpecker

Close-up. Love that red cap!

 

Pileated Woodpecker

The Pileated Woodpeckers play hard-to-get, and I’ve been the loser. Until now!

A couple years ago (maybe longer–time flies!) I took a morning stroll through the neighborhood. This was before I carried my camera everywhere, and the reason I currently do. That morning, I heard pounding in a tree next to the sidewalk and looked up to see TWO Pileated Woodpeckers drilling away on a pine tree. I didn’t even know we had these birds in our area. 

On my last two visits to the botanical garden, I caught a glimpse of one, but it was too fast for me. They don’t hang around long when being chased by the paparazzi. 

I saw at least two on a recent trip to the local state park, but once again, when I downloaded the pictures, they were not to be found in them. Drat! A couple days later, hubby and I went there again. This time, the woodpecker was more intent on what it was doing than on what we were doing. I took a lot of shots, but only got a couple worth sharing. But that works for me! 

The Pileated Woodpecker is a large bird, about the size of the American Crow. Here’s more info: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Pileated_Woodpecker/id
Be sure to check out the voice recording. You’ll certainly know when they are around! 

This is my last Five Photos, Five Stories post. Today, I nominate Susan from  Coming East. I know she has some wonderful photos, and lots of great stories to go with them. Here are the rules:  1) To post a photo a day for five consecutive days and attach a story to the photo.  It can be fiction or non-fiction, a poem or a short paragraph. And 2) each day, nominate another blogger for the challenge.

 

Linking to Wild Bird Wednesday

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Five Photos, Five Stories–Day Four

Five Photos, Five Stories–Day Four
also sharing with Weekly Photo Challenge–On the Way

Eyed Click Beetle

Upon exiting the hiking trail, we walked along the road on the way to our car. Hubby happened to look down and saw this Eyed Click Beetle. They are typically 1″  to 1-3/4″  inches (2.54-4.44 cm) in size. They fly in deciduous woodlands in spring and summer, and prey on wood-boring beetle larvae in decaying logs. When overturned, they can flip themselves into the air with an audible “click.” We kindly moved it out of the road to safety. 

 

Today, I nominate Dorothee Lang at Once Upon Each Day to post Five Photos, Five Stories.

The rules:  1) To post a photo a day for five consecutive days and attach a story to the photo.  It can be fiction or non-fiction, a poem or a short paragraph. And 2) each day, nominate another blogger for the challenge.

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Five Photos, Five Stories–Day Three

Five Photos, Five Stories–Day Three

Osprey Juvenile

This is one of few pictures I took with my camera on Friday’s hike. I switched from my camera bag to my backpack, but forgot to pack the backup battery! I’d gone barely a mile when I got the memo: Battery Exhausted. That’s not likely to be a mistake I’ll make again. I think I need a do over on this trail. 

Today I nominate Sandra, the Mad Snapper, to join the fun with Five Photos, Five Stories.

The rules:  1) To post a photo a day for five consecutive days and attach a story to the photo.  It can be fiction or non-fiction, a poem or a short paragraph. And 2) each day, nominate another blogger for the challenge.

 

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Five Photos, Five Stories–Day One

Five Photos, Five Stories–Day One My sweet friend, Dianna at These Days of Mine, tagged me to join the fun with this recent photo/story challenge.  The rules for Five Photos, Five Stories are 1) to post a photo a day for five consecutive days and attach a story to the photo.  It can be fiction or non-fiction, a poem or a short paragraph. And 2) each day, nominate another blogger for the challenge. Here goes:

Juvenile Osprey–Out on a Limb

The story for this photo starts with a lovely young lady (that part is fiction) who set out to explore the great, wild, unknown parts of her fair city. Her goal: To commune with nature and get a bit of exercise in the process The trail she chose parallels the edges of a lake and a creek. The beginning of the trail wends its way through a marshy area. The dense greenery overhead shields her from the hot sun and provides nesting areas for numerous species of birds, brought to her attention by the demanding calls of the young for the parents to hurry up and put dinner on the table.  As she progresses, she notices underfoot this trail is not hard-packed like the bike trail she walked previously. Some areas hold loose sand as one would find on a beach. It provides a good workout for her calf muscles. It was rather narrow in places as the grasses and foliage carried out their sinister plot to take over. Just past the lake, the trail takes a sharp left and segues into a boardwalk. The surrounding wide-open area looks like a home for trees past their prime. Most are gnarled and bowed down to the earth, waiting to return to the soil. Those remaining tall and erect hold promise in their barren branches. They stretch forth their arms to welcome and invite the Osprey to build a home and nurture their young.                                                                                                

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I would like to nominate Pastor Joseph Elon Lillie of Lillie-Put to share Five Photos, Five Stories