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Good Friday, 2016

Good Friday, 2016

Willy Nilly Friday 5 No. 76
Friday’s Hunt v1.13 brought to you by the letter M, Week’s Favorite, and Bird or Wings
Today’s Flowers #401

1. Mr. & Mrs. Mallard having a little conversation over dinner. 

Starts with M

I was in the backyard taking pictures when our neighbor’s son came home from school. He walks through our yard to get to and from the bus stop on the next street over. He turned to see what subject had my attention and exclaimed, “A duck!” He whipped his phone out of his pocket and said, “I have to get a picture of this!” 

2. The starling darlings monopolized the pedestal birdbath after I cleaned it.

Bird, and Wings, too – European Starlings

3. The American Robin (male) gave up on them and and settled for the birdbath on the ground.

Week’s Favorite

4. The Loropetalum is in bloom.

Today’s Flowers – Loropetalum – Fringe Flower

5. Mr. Mallard is one devoted dude. He stood like a soldier for the longest time while the Mrs. grazed for food, stood in the birdbath doing her yoga leg stretches, and then she finally settled down for a nap.

Linking to:

 

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Wild Bird Wednesday–100! Spring Fledglings

Congratulations to Stewart, our host of Wild Bird Wednesday (WBW)! He pulled out all the stops, and features some amazing birds and his fantastic photography this week to celebrate 100 WBW posts. Be sure to click on over and take a peek. Better yet, bring your bird photos and link up to share them. 

Freshly-Fledged Grackles and Starlings

Today’s lesson, we’re learning to use the birdbath properly. Clicking on any photo will start the slide show, complete with captions.

 

 

 

In This Corner We Have…

Things were ’bout to become interesting. 

On the left we have the Northern Mockingbird, and the European Starling on the right.
On the left we have the Northern Mockingbird, and the European Starling on the right.
The mockingbird is first to enter the arena, and issues a dare to the starling.
The mockingbird is first to enter the arena, and issues a dare to the starling.
The starling calls for back up, and its tag-team partner arrives for the cage match.
The starling calls for back up, and its tag-team partner arrives for the cage match.
The opponents size up the competition.
The opponents size up the competition.
The mockingbird slanders the starling's mother...
The mockingbird slanders the starling’s mother…
...then exits the ring.
…then takes his leave.

Thanks for visiting and leaving your comments during the interruption of our regularly-scheduled program. I’ve missed keeping up with your posts; it’s good to be home. I found a few new things around the backyard upon my return, and will be sharing them with you over the next few days. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One’s Trash, Another’s Treasure

I imagine you’ve heard the old adage, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. My mom and my aunt used to visit a little shop called Trash and Treasures, usually with my cousin and me forced to go along in tow. The merchandise looked like junk to me, at the time. The dilapidated building was dark and dingy inside, tables piled with unmatched dishes and tarnished and rusted items. I’m glad she kept me up-to-date on my tetanus shot. 

Recently, I glanced out the kitchen window and witnessed a squirrel sitting beneath a shower of sunflower seeds. I’m pretty sure there was a huge grin on its face at the treasure that befell. Looking to the feeder above, a starling was throwing out all the trash seed in hope of finding a peanut, raisin or suet pellet it would like to eat. 

I wish I could have gotten a picture of the squirrel sitting back on its haunches with its little paws clutched to its chest, looking toward heaven, sunflower seeds raining down on its head as it gave thanks for the blessing. But it was a quick blessing–there was no time to waste–dinner was served!002 - Copy 003 - Copy

Weekly Photo Challenge–Changing Seasons

The current Weekly Photo Challenge is to show what signals the change of season to us.  I see the changes through avian activity in and around our neighborhood. The goldfinches molt their bright yellow summer plumage for their khakis, for instance. Cooler temperatures are indicated by the fluffing of feathers for insulation. Birds who migrate further south, like hummingbirds, are no longer seen; birds we haven’t seen for a few months, like warblers, white-throated sparrows, starlings and grackles, return. More shore birds are found hanging out at the local fast-food restaurants, hoping for a handout–or visiting smaller bodies of water. (Like those seen here sharing a puddle). Yes, there’s a change in the air, and I see it coming on wings. 

Even the birds in the sky
    know the right times to do things.
The storks, doves, swifts, and thrushes
    know when it is time to migrate.
But my people don’t know
    what the Lord wants them to do.–Jeremiah 8:7