Wild Bird Wednesday #152 Bald Eaglets

Wild Bird Wednesday

Yesterday, I teased you with the far-away photo of the Bald Eagles. Today you can see them better. 

Hubby and I are fascinated with the Bald Eaglets, and being able to observe them. They’re 14 weeks old now, trying out their wings. Well, one of them is overachieving in that department. It is probably the oldest of the three. Two days ago, one eaglet was in the far left tree all alone. When we saw it today, it didn’t appear to have moved at all! Others have seen them testing their wings, crash landing, etc., but they tend to get back to the nest area so they’re ready when the next meal arrives.

Adult Bald Eagle delivered lunch.

Adult Bald Eagle delivers lunch.

That evening, the one that remained at the nest in the morning decided to join its sibling on the branch. You can see it is considerable smaller, probably the last to hatch.

That evening, the one that remained at the nest in the morning decided to join its sibling on the branch. You can see it is considerably smaller, probably the last to hatch.

Around mid-day, Tuesday, I only saw two eaglets, and this one was getting serious.

Around mid-day, Tuesday, I only saw two eaglets, and this one was getting serious.

Look at that vertical jump!

Look at that vertical jump!

Back to the branch.

Back to the branch.

Linking to Wild Bird Wednesday

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35 thoughts on “Wild Bird Wednesday #152 Bald Eaglets

    • Monday’s shot was to show how far away they were to the eye. The city posted No Trespassing signs to keep people from disturbing the eagles. I’m glad to have that zoom feature on my camera. Thank you, Margaret.

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  1. That is great! I was surprised yesterday to see a good size red tail hawk deep in the woods. I didn’t think they’d fly somewhere that had so many trees, but it did.

    I also discovered that the heron I’ve been seeing at Deep Run Park is not a single. The other day it hopped over to the other pond, then there were two flying and lighting down in the trees further back in the park. I know there are rookeries downtown along the James River, but I didn’t realize we had a nest going on just down the street from our house.

    How wonderful that you’ve been able to watch the nest and fledglings as they grow up. Somedays I think it’s a miracle that any of the birds grow up to adults by the time they learn to fly and feed themselves without getting killed.

    Nancy

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    • I agree, Nancy, it is a miracle when they survive. So many birds don’t, so many predators. I sure will miss these, and wish I’d gotten over to see them sooner. I wasn’t sure we could see them, at one point the road was blocked. Now there are No Trespassing signs to (try to) keep people in bounds. There’s a neighborhood that has a lot of tall pines and the herons seek them out to nest each year. It can get pretty smelly (I’ve heard) with fish remains falling to the ground. I don’t think I’d want them that close to my yard! I think it’s a red tail hawk we’ve seen near our daughter’s. I haven’t gotten a photo of it, though.

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      • Ick! I never thought of all the fish leftovers when you have a nest like that near you. Deep Run Park has a lot of tall pine trees, but it also has a lot of people around there. The rookery by the James River is over the rapids, so no one can get very close.

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  2. They are just wonderful, beautiful images. I just shared Bald Eagles as well a few times, such a blessing to have access to a nest site and watch their majesty and beauty unfold~

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