Wild Bird Wednesday 99–American Robin

Robins (of the Thrush family) are common birds in North America. This one posed nicely for the photo shoot, so it gets to be featured this week. 

American Robin

American Robin

The males and females are similar, the male having darker feathers on his head. The female’s head feathers blend with the gray feathers on the back. Robins typically measure 8-11″ in length (20-28 cm).  They can raise as many as three broods a year, though only 40% of the nests successfully produce. Only 25% of those survive through November.

Robins are truly the early bird, I’ve awakened many mornings at 3:00 a.m. and heard them singing. For more information about them, click here.

Linking to Wild Bird Wednesday 

Thanks, Stewart!

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29 thoughts on “Wild Bird Wednesday 99–American Robin

  1. Great photo. It’s fun when a bird cooperates and sits still long enough for a photo. Thanks for sharing these interesting tidbits on Robins. I didn’t know any of it, except that the male and female was similar in color. I enjoy learning new things. Thanks so much. 🙂

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    • Thank you, E.C. And thanks for letting me know you enjoy the details. Wouldn’t it be nice if they all sat still long enough to get a good shot of them?

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  2. We have a nest right outside our family room window high up in an Oak. We had a terrible storm early this morning and I have my fingers crossed that Mama hung on and kept those babies safe. We watched them having their food delivered by hard working parents yesterday!

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    • Robins are tenacious, if it was at all possible, that Mama would make sure those little ones were safe. Those demanding youngsters keep mom and dad busy! I hope you get to see them soon.

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  3. I’ve lived in several areas of this country. My days in northern Ohio and southeast Michigan were filled with these beautiful red-breasted birds. I’ve missed seeing them ever since. Southern states see robins, I think, as they are migrating to warmer weather for the winter. I have read that some robins tough it out in the north until spring makes it comfortable for them again. I can’t remember where I read that, so if anyone challenges it, I cannot refute. I could be wrong.

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