Butterflies

In anticipation of those lovely winged creatures returning to the backyard, I decided to celebrate them with a blog post. This card was made by dry-embossing a brass stencil on vellum, then layering it over card stock on which the design was stenciled using Brilliance inks.

In 2008, we decided to cultivate a butterfly garden. A work in progress, it attracted several varieties of butterflies; and I got a newfound appreciation for those who are able to photograph them well. There’s a saying, “time waits for no man.” Well, neither do butterflies! They flit and flutter almost constantly in their search for nectar. Some species tend to move away from curious camera-wielding onlookers, some go on about their business, and others will flutter around the head of said curious onlooker!


Tiger swallowtail
Skipper
Buckeye

 

Last year, we planted this:

Butterfly weed

 

 

 

 

And got several of these:

Monarch caterpillars

 

 

 

 

 

Which turned into this:

Chrysalis

 

 

 

 

Then into this:

Monarch

 

 

 

 

Words can not explain the elation I felt in finding this one initially perched on the edge of the potting bench. It was camera shy, and escaped to the side of the electric meter, though its wings were still wet. This was the best gift, ever, to be able to witness the transformation.

What the caterpillar calls the end, the master calls the butterfly.
-Richard Bach

7 thoughts on “Butterflies

  1. Oh, I feel the excitement of the monarch, chrysalis and butterfly! Two summers ago I had a black swallowtail do his “thing” on some dill plants in my garden. My two little granddaughters were over very often that summer and witnessed the transformation with me. We actually SAW the caterpillar “unzip” into the chrysalis which is nothing short of a miracle. I was in AWE! I photo documented the process and made a mixed media little book to remember the beautiful blessing we witnessed that summer. We started out with 4-5 caterpillars and they scooted away so fast that I couldn’t follow where they all went!! Apparently they leave their host plant when they’re ready to change to the crysalis stage.One stuck around, thankfully! And I’m planting dill again every year hoping to see this again.

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    1. That is totally awesome! I saw one caterpillar hanging in the “J” formation, attached to the bottom row of siding on the house. I watched for awhile, but went back inside and forgot about it. Later in the afternoon when I returned, it was already a chrysalis. If I get a do-over, I’ll grab a chair next time! I had two to watch, don’t know where the others went. I didn’t realize what I was seeing inside as the color changed from green to black, and that the chrysalis itself is clear. Now I know!

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  2. What a beautiful post for springtime! I think you did very well with your camera. I’ve tried to take photos of butterflies before. It can be quite an athletic effort! Monarchs are about the most beautiful butterflies anywhere. Yet, there are many others more colorful. I don’t recognize any by sight but the Monarch. Your butterfly garden was lovely. Blessings to you, Patti…

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    1. Thank you, Carol. I took quite a few pictures, but didn’t end up with very many that were usable. So thankful I made the switch to digital from film! Maybe this year I can get in some more practice (and exercise)! 🙂 Black swallowtails might be my favorite of the ones that visit our garden, so far. I’ve seen quite a few varieties, including painted ladies and red admirals. Blessings to you, my dear.

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  3. Pingback: Thankful Thursday and 5 Random Thoughts | A New Day Dawns

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